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Seventh Grade Math Teacher

Thank you for posting the

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Thank you for posting the cooking analogy! I've been getting better differentiating in my 7th grade class, but I know I still need to get better, and do even more individualization and grouping similar needs. I have many students with IEPs in each section I teach, but the differentiating is still being used for my students without IEPs who are struggling with the math. I love how you laid out the four major areas to differentiate in just one lesson, and it opened my eyes to new ideas. Thank you!

Masters Student, Harvard Graduate School of Education

I absolutely agree with you,

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I absolutely agree with you, Marisa. Student-centered learning is something that should be applied in all classrooms, and the skills it take special edu teacher has to cater to many different needs is something that all teachers should think about! In that way, special edu is ahead of the game.

I saw this really great blog about engage a variety of different students in a special edu classroom: you might be interested as well. http://rightquestion.org/blog/student-engagement-special-education-class...

Intervention Specialist

Thank you for sharing! I love

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Thank you for sharing! I love how you gave the example of cooking in the kitchen. Everyone has different talents, it's a matter of focusing on differentiating in those four areas you addressed to find/highlight those areas. I like that you make the "special" in special education not sound scary too!

I am exited to share this article with my staff!

Educational Consultant/Author, Southern California

Thank you for this clear,

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Thank you for this clear, concise and creative discussion of the myriad of opportunities teachers have to expand the learning in every class for every student.

Center Based DCD teacher

This article was a great

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This article was a great concise description of how areas of learning can be modified and differentiated to appropriately meet the educational needs of a variety of learners. The instruction, materials and product can all be altered to be the best fit for the particular learner. It's important to remember to consider all of the unique needs of the students we may service.

Former NYC teacher, Consultant, Creator and writer of EdGeeks.com

Jenny, thanks so much for

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Jenny, thanks so much for writing in. I'm so glad that this piece was able to touch your teaching practice and put words to your thoughts:) Hope you're having a great summer!
-MK

Classroom Teacher

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This is great! I have been waiting for someone to put into words what I have been thinking about and struggling to do for several years as an educator. In fact, this is what finally made me settle on a Master's program. I love, love the reference to baking and how everyone differs in their strengths in a kitchen. The separation of ideas is broken down so simply that this some thing I would like to bring back to our school's instructional coach for use in trainings on differentiation and co-teaching. This also made me look at a few things I do that I could do better with instruction delivery. I am constantly reexamining my instruction, lessons, and assignments to identify if they are connecting with ALL my students.

Former NYC teacher, Consultant, Creator and writer of EdGeeks.com

Ms. Garcia

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I'm glad that you found it so simple to apply, that was the goal! You ask a fantastic question and an important one since it applies to many teachers out there. Resources are a great struggle for many of us. One thing I always keep in mind is that if you have a computer (which you obviously do as you are responding to this post), you can always make modifications by creating your own worksheets on microsoft word and making modifications to the original document...and always save everything! It will come in useful with future students. Often, differentiation does not require extra materials, but can be a simple task adjustment (for example: if you set your students up with a writing assignment, you might pull a group of 5 students and give a modified task or do a shared writing activity). It could even be as simple as creating a personal dictionary for each student on index cards or in a notebook, where you assist students in adding appropriate new vocabulary at their level. I guess the greatest tip I can give you is that your brain, passion and creativity are your best resources for differentiation - it takes a wide imagination to reach all students. Finally, DonorsChoose is a fantastic resource that has been supporting teachers for years (http://www.donorschoose.org/) and it might help you too.

Some other ideas that may help:
http://edgeeks.com/?p=69
http://edgeeks.com/?p=1558
http://edgeeks.com/?p=62

And of course if you have further questions you are always welcome to submit them either here or at EdGeeks.com!

High School English Teacher from Navajo Nation

I am sharing this with my

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I am sharing this with my colleagues on differentiation. Too often I get stuck in differentiating in only one area. This guide was simple and easy to apply. I loved it! But I have a question on the resources- what if you are at a rural school that struggles with supplies? My low and high students often get left out in using resources that is right with them and I find it difficult to buy or provide resources on my own. Is there anything I should keep in mind as a new teacher?

Former NYC teacher, Consultant, Creator and writer of EdGeeks.com

Thanks for reading Kacy. I

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Thanks for reading Kacy. I like the way you pay careful attention to the student who is gifted, yet who also experiences challenges in learning. This is definitely an interesting population to work with. Thanks again for stopping by. -Marisa

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