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3rd Grade Teacher and Founder of Luria Learning

Emotional Sandwiching

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Thank you for the reminder about emotional sandwiching. This year I greet every student at the door before school starts. I take that time to connect with each student, give them a smile, and start the day on a positive note. We end the day with a compliment circle. This has become such a nice way of ending each day.

Sacha
www.luria-learning.blogspot.com

I have written about this and

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I have written about this and tryed to send it to you from this sight with no success. If you could contact me directly it could work.
jemacshane@yahoo.com

Montessori 4-6th grade teacher

Language Expression

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Thank you for posting, James.

Would you be willing to go into greater depth on the topic of the language expression continuum you mentioned?

MK

Glasser responce

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Unfortunatly I was the only one that used Dr. Glasser's insights. You and I have another connection. I took the Montessori training course as part of my MS in Art Ed a IIT in '64-'67 . Montessori believed that the Arts were important but she was never able to research the natural value. My MS thesis was; Developing Visual Perception in Children 3 to 11. I was not able to take Montessori Practical Training but as an elementary Art teacher I was able to be respectful of each child's natural ability in ways that would have been more difficult as a regu lar classroom teacher. I am in my fifth re-write of a book on what my student's taught me in 50 years of teaching. A significant aspect is the natural human communication/problem solving sequince of the baby sign language to oral language to all of the Arts to writing that leads to reading.

Montessori 4-6th grade teacher

Wm. Glasser's work

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Hi James,

Thank you for posting about Wm. Glasser's Choice Theory. Is this a program which is active in your school, or is it something you do in your own classroom?

MK

Power, Love, Fun, and Freedom

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I have found and used Dr. Wm Glasser's, "Quality Schools", understanding of the basic spititual/psychological survival needs of power, love, fun, and freedom that provides a more focused interactive classroom social experience.

In my experience all children starting at the age of 4 1/2 have natural unconscious personal insights in each of these social skills. I have most often started with fun as a whole class mutual understanding goal. I write the word Fun on the white or black board with lines to a + and -. The dicussion first goes into the difference between positve and negative fun. The students have aways started with negative fun in their beginning input. It is about disrespect. When positive fun is the pocuse learning always comes up early in the conversations. Then I ask what is the opposite of fun? This they also know. It is borring which to them means if you are not learning anything or you would rather be doing something else.

It is the truth and honesty that is always available that works. The base for love is your personal self-respect. You cannot respect someone else more than your respect yourself.

Special Education Teacher

Great post! I really liked

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Great post! I really liked Topic #3. I really agree with you when using emotional sandwiching. We have class roles in my classroom and I find student's really take pride in their role. It is a time in the day when they feel important and everyone values what they are doing.
Additionally, my school participates in PBS and we have a school wide "cash system." Students are rewarded for positive behavior and this really does fuel their "banking system". When we are constantly depositing money into our students it makes them feel great but also I see an improvement in their quality of work and attention.

I really appreciate your post and I agree completely. Thanks.

-Sarah

Montessori 4-6th grade teacher

Parents SEL resources

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Hi Karla,

You make a very good point. As a matter of fact, I draw on my "problem-solving" resources as often with other adults as with children!

Dr. Myrna Shure has a wonderful treatment of basic SEL skills for parents. "Raising a Thinking Child" and "Raising a Thinking Pre-Teen" are both widely available in public libaries and adapt her classroom curriculum specifically for parents. She has also produced a parent workbook which many schools use in their parenting classes. It allows parents to do a self-study of the curriculum materials and basically teach themselves what they would get in a training.

Dr. Shure's foundational work in the field of SEL produced some of the earliest findings about the links between SEL and academic performance. Not surprisingly, her longitudinal research showed that students who use problem-solving techniques both at home and at school are likely to see the greatest benefits from SEL training.

It was parenting that got me into the SEL field. I was lucky to have a little SEL lab when my identical twins were born. Observing their interactions helped me to appreciate how easy it is for simple things to lead to conflict.

We always have a choice when conflict arises. We can use it as a learning opportunity, or treat it like an intrusion which has to be stopped. As parents, and as teachers, we make that choice several times a day. Sometimes we make it several times an hour!

MK

Empowering parents to empower their children (www.totthoughts.com)

SEL in parenting

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These tips are great, they highlight the importance of applying interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligences in teaching.

I do want to point out that these tips need not be limited to the educational arena but are equally valuable in parenting. I am continuously drawing on SEL techniques in negotiating with my children (http://totthoughts.com/the-negotiator/). :)

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