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its very good information

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its very good information about computer providing such information is an inspiring because its really helpful for the readers and very useful technology. I like your post its very informative and very awesome. Keep providing such kind of good post.

co-founder of feynlabs

comp science ..

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:)
Ah .. This already became too long (hence had to split in two posts)
we are doing a lot of work with the Raspberry Pi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi) and that goes deep into comp science. I have requested another article on edutopia .. where we can share what we are doing with the Pi .. hopefully I can post it in the next few weeks. Thanks for your comemnts and feedback kind rgds Ajit

Computer science?

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These strike me as being valuable strategies for teaching programming. One thing that I don't see, though, is any mention of computer science. Maybe this is part of "other math and science disciplines" in the first Principles post, but I can't tell--and of course there's a tight relationship between programming and other topics in computer science, which would be worth emphasizing independent of connections to other fields.

co-founder of feynlabs

:) thanks Bon!

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:) thanks Bon!

Math Mom & Education Advocate

"9. Separate the Exceptions

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"9. Separate the Exceptions from the Rules"

How about let them learn the exceptions from your #5 (hacking) and then teach them the real rules?

And I still think the more people learn to break things, the more likely they'll be to learn and think about everything.

Thanks for all ten - they are great!

co-founder of feynlabs

athetics analogy and systems thinking ..

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Hello Tim
Great analogy(athetics)
Love it :)
The key to these analogies is how quickly kids 'get' them i.e. the idea
I will use it and refer you where I do :)
kind rgds
Ajit

Parent, technologist, runner - lover of learning

The "why"

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Agree with what you say - how could I not?

In terms of rules and exceptions, I think the "why" is always really important. To explain a new concept (say like passing parameters by reference) needs a real explanation as to why it is necessary especially when you can (in many cases) program the same thing in two different ways. Having the right example which shows the efficiency of why you would do it (speed or number of lines of code) - or something else is necessary.

I am an athletics coach in my spare time and encourage children to do warm up, cool down and drills during a training session. I have rarely found a child who wants to do these things rather than just going out and just running (or jumping, throwing etc.). In early years, therefore, it is just part of the game they play. As they grow older and more proficient, they start to understand why they do these parts of a session (ie to become a better athlete) and hence start to appreciate what individual things need to be practiced in order to become better as a whole. Although the analogy is not great, I think the same applies to programming. Children cannot really appreciate the individual components of programming until they have played with them as a whole and start to appreciate why each of them has a role to play.

co-founder of feynlabs

many thanks for posting the

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many thanks for posting the second set and also for your comments on the first 5 principles. welcome thoughts and feedback rgds Ajit

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