Comments (6)

Comment RSS

Respect. Appreciation.

Was this helpful?
0

Respect. Appreciation. Cooperation. Teamwork. All words that I emphasize the importance of in my classroom. This was a quick and easy read, yet it packed a punch full of important reminders. The daily demands on teachers in today's classrooms aren't always realized by non-teachers, and sometimes not by administrators either. With the academic curriculum at the forefront of our day, we must also make time for the social curriculum too. Teaching students to respect that others are different is key, but showing them how to appreciate those differences is often missing. I make an effort to build a strong classroom community in my 2nd grade homeroom of 28 diverse learners and friends. We make time for daily "thank you's" and recognitions between classmates; similar to what the author referred to as "appreciations". I spend more time in the beginning of the year doing team building activities, and getting-to-know you exercises, but I recognize that these activities have their place in the classroom throughout the year. My version of "Cross the Line" is called "Just Like Me", and is a quick way for students to see which of their friends have similar interests or concerns. I like the quick "Pass the Pulse" activity, which the author described and plan to implement that into my weekly routines next school year.

I really like this concept.

Was this helpful?
0

I really like this concept. It is so important to teach children to relate to one another, especially because our world is so global these days. This idea helps all children learn to connect to one another regardless of ability, gender, race or other attributes. It goes beyond multiculturalism and helps students “see” each other on a human level. Pass-the-Pulse seems like an excellent bonding exercise for students, where they are all sharing in this special moment together, this is something that I am planning on implementing in my own classroom full of preschoolers. It is such a universal experience that all children can participate and benefit form it.

Great Read

Was this helpful?
0

Great article. The need to develop social skills not only provides students with more opportunity for basic interactions but also increase learning potential and reduces the threat of bullying.

Here at American College of Education (ACE), we offer educators the Certificate in Effective Classroom Management developed with Dr. Howie Knoff, a nationally renowned expert in classroom management. To learn more about this program, click here: http://www.ace.edu/academics/subject-area-certificates/effective-classro...

As a special needs educator,

Was this helpful?
0

As a special needs educator, I firmly believe that building social and emotional skills in elementary students is critical. I agree with the article. I think it is imperative for students to be exposed to diversity and situations that challenge their understanding of reality; however, I also think is important for students to know that they are not alone. The social and emotional coping skills a child develops at an early age serves as the foundation for future success. Through team work, goal setting, social stories, group acceptance, and personal acceptance, children will be able to use a variety of skills as stepping stones for future endeavors. I liked the "brain analogy" that was used in the article. "Each part of an individuals brain works together. Likewise, each brain is made to interact with the brain of each person we interact with".

Kids need a balance when it comes to support and independence. As teachers, it is our job to teach students accordingly.

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

i think for better

Was this helpful?
0

i think for better development in kids outdoors camps are really important because it teaches them how to develop oneself alone with out anyones help Separate the process of art from the product of art. Children enjoy both the process and the product of art. One of the main goals of your program is to help children experience the joy of creativity and the satisfaction of mastery. While adults focus on the process of art, children are often concerned with the product. They want their project to look good and be worthy of admiration. So, it’s important to keep both the process and the product in mind when you offer an art activity to the children. You can do this by providing a variety of arts and crafts materials that are stimulating, age-appropriate, and easy to be successful with, and by providing just the right amount instruction and inspiration.

see more see less