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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation
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5 Resources for Parent-Teacher Conferences

For many educators, conferences are coming up soon, and it can be a stressful time of the school year. To help parents and educators prepare for parent-teacher conferences, we've rounded up a variety of web resources.

From ideas for highlighting student progress, to questions every parent should ask, these are some of our favorite articles and resources that cover parent-teacher conferencing. Hope you all have a great rest of the school year!

Parent-Teacher Conference Reading List

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neelakantam's picture

In this blog we saw that school administration conducted the parent-teacher meeting. This is very useful to Parents. How to attend the meeting and what will we do in that school. The school conducts the meeting on spring season. They arranged the meeting on end of the year. So people learn many things from this blog. This blog is very useful to Ours. Thanking you.

The Dixie Diarist's picture
The Dixie Diarist
Teacher, Writer, and Artist

RIP TIDE

At the beginning of the spring semester one year, a helicopter parent team came to meet with all of their eighth grade son's teachers. The couple said we're tired of helicoptering and enabling and pretty much doing all of his work for him. It's sink-or-swim time, they said, and we've told him so, too. He knows we're meeting with you today.

I liked this. I liked this a lot. My fellow teachers and I winked at each other. And I liked their son, too. He was oblivious to the educational fun around him, but he had good manners and he was respectful. I just never knew he was alive some days, even though his eyes were open and I could see him breathing. I often thought about tossing a hissing firecracker at him to help increase his level of interest in what we were doing. I'm sure he would have looked at the shredded firecracker on his desk, looked at me, looked back at the shreds, and then looked at the clock on the wall to see how much longer he had to endure sitting in a class not doing or saying anything. All that without blinking.

Anyway, so we all let him sink or swim. He chose to furiously tread water. He made it out of eighth grade just fine. I don't know how the parents turned out. I'm assuming they got on with their lives and were enjoying themselves.

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