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Instructional Coach

I LOVE this post. Reminds me

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I LOVE this post. Reminds me of a lot of reading I've been doing and thinking about lately, particularly Rick Wormeli's work.

meta-pedagogy.blogspot.com

Thoughts on Janet's reply

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Janet, thank you for your thoughtful response. Indeed, a huge part of assessment comes back to what our goals are for our students. Do we want them to show the ability to follow directions (read chapter 4 for homework, quiz tomorrow)? Consistency in completing assignments (problems 1-8, due on Friday)? Mastery of the material at the end of our unit? Does effort matter? Or, is education a journey, and each of these is a part of the journey for our students? These are some difficult questions that need to be decided by the teacher, school, and community.

International Educator, Certified by the NBPTS | Educational Leader, Licens

Response to Larry's Question

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The answer to your question depends on a number of things.

When you give a quiz, does the quiz figure into the final grade? If so, consider whether a quiz represents a student's level of learning or rate of learning. If a student did not read a chapter of a book one night but, in the end, understands the whole novel better than most students in the class, does the average of the grades represent the student's knowledge of content or time management skills?

Consider listing all the things you want students to demonstrate they know and can do by the end of a unit. Note when students demonstrate each of those pieces of knowledge or skills using checklists or rubrics. A quiz can be one piece of evidence. Let students know where they are at and give them all as many opportunities as are necessary to demonstrate the knowledge and skills.

If students are not hitting the stated objectives, you have to play detective to find out whether the content is too difficult and the student needs extra assistance - or if the student has personal obstacles keeping him/her from completing the work. Work from there.

Janet | expateducator.com

I love many of these ideas.

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I love many of these ideas. Finding different ways to reach our students is a key to learning! I do want to ask one question: why would we look for a reason to "throw out" a quiz? If that quiz--at the time it was taken--measured something the teacher deemed important, than wouldn't it need to remain as a piece of the assessment puzzle? And is it reasonable to throw out that quiz for one student, but count it for another? I do worry about too much emphasis being placed on high grades, which then pressures us as teachers to help the students deliver those grades. Thoughts?

time

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Toni, that's a good question...one i have asked. I think the answer lies somewhere in a combination of continuing to narrow the scope of contact, or "pull the weeds" as Reeves would say. But it's not that simple. For me, the other half lies in creating a classroom environment that is highly collaborative and problem-based/project based. Ones the wheels get into motion, you're naturally going to cycle through the teams to check in on their progress. That's a good opportunity to pull kids aside for a short one-on-one. Of course, taking time for plenty of peer-assessment and self-assessment through that same collaborative process leads the students more prepared to make the most out of the individual time with you, so it becomes more efficient. This is the sort of thing i try to do.

8th grade social studies teacher

How do you manage the time

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I am a firm believer in all of Marzano's ideas. However, where I always fall down is in the amount of time this type of personalized assessment takes. The next step in an article like this is the practical advice on time management that would help in making these assessment ideas a reality.

International Educator, Certified by the NBPTS | Educational Leader, Licens

So many great things here...

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Authentic problems.
Project-based learning.
Ongoing, alternative forms of assessment.

I find interviews especially powerful because I can adjust the questioning to see how high the students' thinking can go. I can also immediately trouble-shoot misunderstandings or misconceptions.

Many companies such as Delloite encourage their employees to do community service. I suspect they'd have engineers that would love to work with your math and engineering students :).

Janet | expateducator.com

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