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4th grade STEM teacher from Richfield, Minnesota

Checking for Understanding

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Thanks for sharing your ideas on checking for understanding using apps. I agree that you would get more feedback from using one of these apps than from a bubble multiple choice test. Many of the apps you describe sound very engaging for the students to write and speak about what they know. It really gives options for creative assessment.

8th grade special education math teacher

Hi - Can you recommend some

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Hi - Can you recommend some math ipad apps for the special education middle school child? (Grades 6-8). Thank you

Artist and Educator

A secret

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Here is my little secret, some of the math apps were originally slated for remembering but I asked for them to be pulled at the last minute. Here was my reasoning ...
Under "understanding" or really "comprehension" Bloom speaks about the transfer of one form of knowledge to another form as a way to build comprehension. Thus a verbal word problem becomes sentence of symbols and numbers, a fraction becomes a decimal and a percentage a point on a number line. These changes are slight yet significant. Asking students to translate between different forms of content is not the same as finding the right answer from a multiple choice line up, so these apps got a boost up. I also need to add that the revised taxonomy has levels within each cognitive domain which can blur the lines even more. Thank you for your comments, I appreciate the dialog.

I believe that one of the

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I believe that one of the ways technology can be used to improve education is as a means of giving students more opportunities to communicate -- to share their thinking and understanding with others. So I appreciate you addressing this issue in connection with iPad Apps.

Most of the Apps you included do help students verbalize their understanding or help teachers document it, except for the two math apps and Bluster. These apps only test knowledge. Then don't let students do any of the things you recommended in your criteria.

The iLiveMath app has the appearance of connecting math to the real world when it really only connects math to colorful pictures. Most of the problems in the app aren't problems you would solve in the real world (Does a whale really "sing" for 24 hours straight?) And, did you notice how often the same problem comes up with different numbers? In a demo of level 3 I viewed, every 4th problem was a repeat, just different numbers. So this app assesses only a narrow range of math skills. It's attractive photos are what sells it, and that is its best feature.

Computer Specialist for Manhattan Beach K-5 school

Thanks these reviews are

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Thanks these reviews are super helpful!

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