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Fourth grade homeroom teacher in Bangkok, Thailand

This is a great article on

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This is a great article on trust. I moved grades this year and am able to give my students even more responsibility. I love the student's input and class ideas. The more trusted they feel it seems the more innovative their ideas become. This piece showed me more ways I can work towards trusting my students.

Education Specialist

Trust in human nature, we are

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Trust in human nature, we are all born inquisitive learners, takes educators to a space wherein we have no need to require courses & we have no need to affix a grade to a student's work. The results, a vastly superior acceptance to the college of their first choice (for those who choose college, which this choice has been documented to at least equal conventional schools) and a deep ability to pursue life's passions. See Rick Posner, Lives of Passion, School of Hope, anything written by A.S. Neill, or any of the writings on Sudbury Valley Schools for more concrete examples of what happens when students are really educated in a space of trust.

Editorial Assistant and Blogger

An English teacher I've

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An English teacher I've worked with always does a great job of explaining to her students that she expects hard work on cooperative group projects. When students meet her expectations, she arranges to have the principal come by to catch them being awesome.

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

LOVE this paragraph you wrote

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LOVE this paragraph you wrote Todd:

"Education is catastrophically deficient in trust. Pro-accountability education reformers presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable teachers. Traditional instructors presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable students. Both viewpoints emerge from a noble desire to make classrooms high-performance spaces, but in actuality they suppress excellence."

It'd be nice to share some examples on how you trust students (and even for parents -- how you trust your children) and the results you've seen. From talking to students in other cultures, for example, I've found that Finnish students tend to have a high level of trust from their teachers and it empowers them.

Any examples (even if they're little things) that we can share?

Todd, This is a great

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Todd, This is a great article. The benefits of teachers trusting and praising their students is immense.

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