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Co-Director East Bay WL Project at UC Berkeley Language Center

@Gloria - thanks for that

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@Gloria - thanks for that comment too, Gloria. I like when students can help create the rubrics - even more engagement is possible. I think, however, that some rubrics need not be created by the students - ie, for creativity, communication, critical thinking and collaboration, although I have had students tell me which aspects of critical thinking, for example, are more useful to them for a given project. As for the content rubrics - ie, the ones about specific targeted standards in our content areas - there is a lot more opportunity for students to participate in the development of the rubrics. As I work with my French students, I find that the more advanced classes are better prepared to do this than the first year students. That comes down to an individual teacher's choice as (s)he knows his/her classes. Some groups are more able to rise to the challenges than others, I have found. Just my 2 cents!

Secondary Education student in Chicago

Good article, but I'd like to

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Good article, but I'd like to suggest teachers think about introducing rubrics later in the process, after the students have already used an inductive process to figure out their own criteria for the work. Students can then contribute meaningfully to the creation of the rubric. This thoughtful piece for High Tech High's UnBoxed journal describes how a teacher's shift "from a teacher-centered to a student-centered model was instrumental in getting kids to do more reworking": http://www.hightechhigh.org/unboxed/issue6/collaboration/

Editor in Chief at the Buck Institute for Education

Thanks Don - Good point that

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Thanks Don - Good point that a teacher should usually know when good work is being produced well before the presentation date; should be no surprises!

Co-Director East Bay WL Project at UC Berkeley Language Center

Great article, as always

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Great article, as always John! Thanks for the reminders - in the hectic business of the classroom, it is so easy to overlook the essentials. When I seek to conscientiously embed the 8 elements, and revisit often the driving questions, our knows and our needs to know, and reflect, reflect, reflect, these habits take hold and the outcomes are so much better! I know my students are producing great work as I hear and see their thinking along the way. By the time presentations are ready, there should be few if any surprises, and the assessments can easily be done by the students themselves. I love it when a group of students can tell me that they think they have earned X grade because the rubrics were clear to them, and they can provide exemplars to support their claims. I think they are often harder on themselves than I am! Joyful learning at its best - love that!
Cheers,
Don

Gifted and Talented Teacher from New Jersey

This article was so helpful!

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This article was so helpful! I run a huge PBL every year and the showcasing of work is always a nerve-crumbling experience. Thank you for the useful tips! I'm definitely saving this article for future reference.

Elementary School Teacher

Great article! Incredibly

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Great article! Incredibly informative. I love the 8 essentials for effective PBL. I have used rubrics consistently and find them to be so essential in PBL environments. Thanks for the insights!

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