Comments (41)

Comment RSS
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Jenn - Have you checked out

Was this helpful?
+1

Jenn - Have you checked out all of our blogs on the Flipped Classroom: http://www.edutopia.org/blogs/tag/flipped-classroom.

Also, on twitter there's an active community that talks about the Flipped Classroom. You can search #flipclass or #fliplearning on Twitter and connect to experts around the world.

Hope this helps!

Hi, I was just wondering if

Was this helpful?
0

Hi, I was just wondering if you have examples and/or links to your examples? Thank you for taking the time for this review of the proccess. I found it very interesting. -Jenn

Physics and math teacher.

Flipped Classroom

Was this helpful?
0

I have considered flipping, at least partially, but I would not be able to do it as a whole. I think it would be a nice alternative for some but difficult to implement in my district where access to the internet is an issue still. Thank you for the nice article.

8th Grade MathTeacher

Our district is in the

Was this helpful?
0

Our district is in the process of converting to flipped lessons. We have one Middle School that began this year. The other Middle Schools will begin next year. We have received positive feedback from the Math Coaches, so I am looking forward to the implementation. Each Math teacher has a computer lab attached to their room with approximately 30 computers, so access to technology is not a problem. My only concern is are those students who take the bus and have to eat breakfast once they arrive...when will they find the time? Aside from that, I look forward to being able to do more of the hands-on pieces in the classroom rather than for homework!

Wowzers offers online Game-based Math curriculum for Grades 3-8

Expanding the 'Flipped Classroom' definition

Was this helpful?
0

As always in education, schools and classrooms are forced to adapt strategies and learning methods to fit their environment and demographics. Why should the 'flipped classroom' be any different?

The main advantage of flipped classrooms is to offer students the ability to self-learn the concepts via digital resources. We believe students can do this within the classroom as well! With the correct content, students can self-learn the needed content and concepts right in the classroom (or at home), while the teacher scaffolds and further develops these newly-learned ideas.

To learn more about how digital learning content can be utilized to build a flipped classroom within school walls, check out this blog post - http://blog.wowzers.com/bid/271926/Differentiate-Your-Classroom-Instruct...

5th grade teacher from New Jersey

Candice, I have been flipping

Was this helpful?
0

Candice, I have been flipping my math class for over a year and I can tell you that after a year I still haven't perfected it yet, but I can share things that have worked for me. 1) When I create or use a video I keep it less than then minutes for the students to watch at home. 2) After the video the students answer questions I have embedded in a webpage with the video. 3) I use a Google Script called Flubaroo which grades the student questions and sends them an email about how well they did on the homework. This way when the students walk in the next day I divide them up into groups right away. Have 2 or three groups to meet with. 1 group to give more challenging work to, while with the other group or two, re-teach things they might not have understood. I usually have 20 extra minutes a day which I use for hands on activities, if you have completed the work. Check out this site I created to help you get started. https://sites.google.com/site/ittechforteachers/blended-classroom I would try to flip an entire chapter and see what the results are. Some students may move faster than others and can come and be 'math helpers' for other students in the room as well. Let me know if I can be of more help.

Sixth grade math, science and social studies teacher from Pittsburgh, PA

I have been contemplating

Was this helpful?
0

I have been contemplating flipping my math classroom. When my principal first presented this new idea at a faculty meeting, I was skeptical yet intrigued. I too thought about the students in my classroom that would not be able to access the videos on the Internet. However, I was loving the idea that I would have more class time to differentiate instruction and actually work through practice math problems and dig deeper than just "solve this problem" type problems.
I have tried a few "flipped" lessons but have not done the full flip. Can anyone give me advice or insight into how you run the class time that you have after the students watch the video/read the notes at home? I am specifically interested in any advice on incorporating small, differentiated group activiites or project based learning? Also, what are some ways that you assess learning and mastery of the skills?

NBCT, science educator

Dear Teacher..

Was this helpful?
0

Like any instructional strategy, there are always going to be benefits and challenges. The "flipped" concept is not new; it is grounded in educational history. Remember the days of taking work home, working independently, and using this experience in the next classroom activity? The only difference now is that technology has enhanced this past practice and helped teachers to be more efficient and effective in their practice. In a modern blended learning classroom, I can provide instantaneous interventions to my students based on student management system data-this was impossible without technology.

Teacher

Pro/Con Chart (Affordances/Constraints)

Was this helpful?
0

I've been slowly trying to collect a set of pros/cons (affordances/constraints) related to flipped teaching and a few questions. They are posted here: http://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/Flipped+Teaching

High school math teacher from California

Options for electronic access

Was this helpful?
0

Another option: have them read printed material on the subject and come in prepared to discuss it and/or do a written assignment. I'm a math teacher and I am planning to use a livescribe pen which I can email to students as an interactive pdf. So, they see the notes and hear my voice, much like a khan academy lesson (but there are not a lot of color choices). However, they are also able to print the notes, which can't be done with video. This also allows me to pre-print the notes for anyone who needs them and they can take them home to study. In every case, I plan to give students a comprehension assignment that connects to the presentation or notes.

Generally, this approach is still reliant upon internet/computer access outside the classroom, I know. However, I think there are ways to adapt the lessons so that students study the material before coming to class, then the main points are reviewed and an assignment or assignments can be begun and hopefully completed during class. Assignments can be individual or group/partner or a little bit of both.

Students could review a text section and take notes on it, read assigned pages, or review a handout with a short question and answer portion attached outside of class and then come in to class with questions.

In a couple of weeks, I will have a blog set up where anyone can post ideas and questions. I'll come back to this article and post the link. I'd love to know what successes and hurdles we are all facing as we attempt to incorporate this approach in our classes.

I have loved the few flipped lessons I've done and I had students fill out feedback forms afterwards. They seemed to love it too. They gave good suggestions for improvement including a formal review of the material at the start of class (also a great technique for kids who didn't complete the assignment for whatever reason) and examples that directly pertain to the types of math problems they needed to solve. [I had students review khan academy and brightstorm videos - I didn't create my own. There were problems with that approach in that notation and some formula details differed from what was used in the text. So, this year I will use a combination of pre-created videos and some of my own with the livescribe pen and other free resources available.]

see more see less