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middle school science inclusion teacher.

As for the rest of you. I

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As for the rest of you. I think you are GREAT and FANTASTIC for reading this article and leaving comments to be known, This is a community that I would like to be more a part of. The Inquiry Club,
I'm in. I love the advice. LOVE it!!! The idea that we should give them 5-7 seconds is a bit disgusting if you stop and think about that some more... more than 7 seconds. PLEASE!! Let's consider the following..... stumble, stumble,trip. Sorry, I get so excited and nervous all at the same time. Kids are so important and we have to learn how to honor them as well as teach them to honor themselves by honoring others. PEACE

middle school science inclusion teacher.

my thoughts exactly. We get

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my thoughts exactly. We get comfortable asking those questions and getting those safe answers, but that is not my definition of engaging. Think deeper teachers! Model the messy inquiry method. Work on logic puzzles. Answer questions that do not have a definite answer. Get out there!!! (I feel better) Have a great day/night!

middle school science inclusion teacher.

So I was trying to add the

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So I was trying to add the question related comment to the very first comment-maker (her name escapes me (due to frustration)) as a reply. However, it appears in the general stream of comments to this post. Which I think is brilliant.! Just wish my comment appeared in her reply comment-box-space. ???

Early childhood teacher, writer, life-long learner

Thanks also for all the other

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Thanks also for all the other comments on this blog. I have enjoyed following the links through to other posts: and interesting conversation.

Early childhood teacher, writer, life-long learner

This is a great article and

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This is a great article and the questions are very effective ones for extending thinking, learning, and thinking about learning; all slightly different things. Sometimes it is easy to ask "Why do you think that?" when an incorrect answer/explanation has been given, and ask "How do you know that?" when a correct answer/explanation is given. This can alert the student (and others) to the appropriateness of the response. I think that if the "thinking" question is asked for all responses, students are asked to provide more information which may either clarify to the teacher where the misunderstandings are, or help the student to explain and clarify their own understandings.

Thanks for the kind words

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Thanks for the kind words Mark.

Adventure educator, author, playful learner, founder of playmeo.com

So simple, yet so good.

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So simple, yet so good. Thanks for sharing Jim. This idea is going straight to my blog, to benefit tons of experiential educators out there... http://blog.playmeo.com

A great post and, for me,

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A great post and, for me, great timing on finding it. Saw this tweeted out this morning after writing the following post http://mrdardy.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/questions/ last night. There is an additional question / questioning technique I'd add. When I am trying to get a good conversation started in my math class I am trying to get myself to remember to do the following. Student A might offer a comment. I will then ask another student if they can summarize what they think student A just said. I stole this idea from Ben Blum-Smith's blog (http://researchinpractice.wordpress.com) I find it is a great way to hear what students think that they understand and a way to emphasize that they should be listening to each other as well as listening to me.

Passionate change agent

Love this dialogue. I just

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Love this dialogue.

I just wrote a blog about what I feel is THE most important question we can ask students, or adults for that matter. Click below to find out what it is.

http://kaleidoeye.com/who-are-you/

Regards,
Mike

Assistant director of professional development, YUSP

I have always had these

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I have always had these questions posted in my classroom because a wonderful group of teachers teaching Every Day Counts, about 16 years ago taught me that this is how my students would learn. The more I asked the questions, the more my babies had to reflect on their knowledge, both prior and new knowledge. My babies were in Kinder- imagine how these questions could validate the thinking of all your students.

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