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While I agree completely with

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While I agree completely with you on many of the topics, I feel as though the section of affording college was quickly reviewed. One of the major points that eliminates many from entering college is that of money. There are many talented students (regardless of race, etc) that simply can not afford to go and yes while students and parents need to not think about this in their senior year, this idea should start at the Middle School level or earlier. I have children that are going into Kindergarten in the fall. We were handed a brochure on our state's higher education trust plan for the orientation to Kindergarten. I believe that all parents should get this information as soon as possible to start thinking. Now, I do realize that many parents would look at this and think, "nah, I have time" but that is another obstacle that needs to be overcome as well.

Foundations teacher- A course for successful transition into adulthood

The key is helping them find themselves and passion for future

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I realized these things you mentioned as a parent as well as a high school teacher and I am a college grad. I quickly understood that my experiences didn't mean my own children would desire what I had. I created an entire class around helping ALL students find their 'mojo' for the future. If we do a better job of that, they will go find their pathways much more easily than they do now. The message we are currently sending is that if you don't go to college you won't be successful. Or if you go you will be 'rich'. Most kids (even children of college grads) know almost nothing real about what it is, what it takes and why they should go or not. We must do more concrete things to help them find their course of action first THEN if college is a bridge to get there...THEY will find ways to cross it. www.getreallearning.com

Secondary Spanish and ELL teacher from a rural area in Virginia

I have had the honor to teach

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I have had the honor to teach in the Upward Bound Program at our local community college. For anyone not sure what Upward Bound is, it is a college prep program for low-income students. The majority are African American and one of the requirements into the program is to be a first generation college student. Over the course of the years I have seen students of color obtain a wide varitey of college degrees because of this program. Students begin in the 9th grade and are encourgaged up to college. Several return from college to serve as tutor mentors. Unfortuately,our local Upward Bound program lost their funding. Our students (coming in from 5 different counties) are now on their own to apply to college and even receive the help they need. We plan to continue to spirt of Upward Bound in our high school but end of Upward Bound was a hard blow to our community.

ECHS Teaching Assistant

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John,
Hopefully when your stepson is that age, he won't be beholden to a time-based education system, and will already have at least the equivalent of an associate degree, without the need for two more years of day incarceration.

Director of Programming and Innovation @Edutopia

Faces of color

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Dear RMc -

We are in the process of overhauling our blogger line-up. Look for more faces of color soon! You're right, and we're fixing that.

best,
betty

Parent of 1 drop-out, 1 grad with 2 degrees, and 1 current college attendee

Newbie observation

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I don’t know how to begin. I arrived at this site as a result of a general search for information on “Alliance for Generational Equity”
Upon reading the “How to Provide Guidance to First Generation College-Bound Students”
By DANIELLE MOSS LEE, I thought “hmmm verbose, but interesting.” I started to click away and move on to other subjects when I saw the column of blog participants to the right margin of the page and realized that interestingly there were no faces of color.
While the article revealed a somewhat elitist opinion about education, I wrote that off to my own prejudices and continued my search for an explanation for this phenomenon. Since I had a stroke about a year ago, maybe I’m just not thinking clearly……….. or is there another explanation?

This is great advice...

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...but I wonder how long it will hold true.

College is changing. Education is changing.

I honestly wonder what it will be like when my stepson (now 4.5 years old) is in his junior year of high school. Will college be the best way forward? Or just one of the ways?

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