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Global PBL, student engagement in STEM, language practice

NETS-S standards to compare to your great list

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Mary Beth, this is a terrific matrix to help people realize that developmentally, students need to do some things before they can do other things, and that they may need to review what "was covered last year" too.
Have you thought about organizing all these great activities around the NETS-S? The National Educational Technology Standards for Students were created collaboratively by ISTE and many educators and have been revised. They are used in multiple countries, not just the US, thanks to the work of ISTE.

Here's a link:
http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students.aspx
The broad overview (each standard has additional parts):
•Demonstrate creativity and innovation
•Communicate and collaborate
•Conduct research and use information
•Think critically, solve problems, and make decisions
•Use technology effectively and productively

A grade 4 teacher in Georgia, Elizabeth Simmons, created computer-based activities throughout the school year to meet all the NETS-S with her students. Her class collaborated with a class in the UK. That teacher won an award for "most outstanding use of ed tech in UK schools"!
Elizabeth Simmons was invited to be the keynote of the Global Education Conference in Nov. 2010. Here's the recording of her session:
http://bit.ly/6NETS-S

Here is a link to her slides:
http://scr.bi/Gr4NETS

I hope that others who are active on the Edutopia site could help you organize the items under the NETS-S and suggest what else might be helpful to add. For those looking to fulfill the "Communicate and collaborate" standard, I recommend using the free ePals Global Community to find other teachers in 200 countries, in the largest online network of K12 teachers in the world. You can also use ePals SchoolMail for students to communicate, or ePals Student Forums for students safely asking and answering questions about their lives. (All these have translation to 58 languages.) http://www.epals.com

Elementary School Computer Lab Teacher

Computer Lab Teacher

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Nice job with the matrix of skills! I too have taught in a computer lab with 45 minute classes coming and going for quite a long time. And, have spanned grades 2 through 8. Recently I have become frustrated trying to do "bigger picture", project-based learning in the special subject setting. I see over 600 students each week and am trying to develop a good method of managing and organizing myself. It is difficult to do some types of activities. For example, if I want my classes to Skype with another class, author, etc., I have to find volunteers for all of my classes throughout the week. That is nearly impossible. So, if you can pass along some organizational wisdom in addition to your skills matrix it would be greatly appreciated!! BTW, have you begun attempting to align to SAS? Your thoughts on that! :-)

Computer Lab Curriculum

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This is a very comprehensive list of "must knows" for the computer lab. I too work in a Title 1 school where students have little or no access to computers after school is out, some, even after their computer class is over for the day. While we have student computers in each of our classrooms, and we are known for our level of technology in the classroom, I often ask myself what good does it do if the students cannot continue the practice at home, and get computer time 2 or three times a week.

What caught my eye about your list is that the span of grades K-6 is the same at my school. Unfortunately, because of the lack of practice, the items you have listed as being accomplished by 6th grade, well, not many of my students have that mastery. I actually run the science lab at my school and am fortunate to have enough laptops in my room that students can work in pairs on them. But with some groups just logging in to the machines is a chore, and this is a task that should be known by kinder-first grade.

I am not giving up though, I am going to print a copy of the list and pass it along to our computer teacher and also keep it for my lab, as it is a useful guide.

Thanks for posting it!

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

Glad it is helpful

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Thanks for the feedback. I'm glad to know the list is helpful. As for a PDF, I will see what I can do.

Great list...

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"Know how to use tools like Edmodo or Schoology to discuss, share and blog about course content
Collaborate with peers on digital projects
Begin to look for solutions to real-world problems through the lens of technology..."
I appreciate that you included these ideas as Introduction at the primary grades. Showing and demonstrating can be good for the teacher as well.

This is an excellent list. I

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This is an excellent list. I appreciate you sharing such a wonderful resource. I echo the thought that having this in downloadable form would be a great idea. I plan to share this list on my home school educators 2.0 wiki. This is not only an excellent resource for those of us who teach but also a great resource for parents. Thank you for sharing.

I have 11 years experience

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I have 11 years experience teaching in a computer lab, your list is spot-on! Thank you! I would love to be able to download the chart?

K-4 Technology Facilitator, suburban Maryland

perfect timing

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Perfect timing MB. I totally needed this kind of information TODAY and here it is...Thanks!

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

Student Access

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Yes, Donna. We can't assume that just because a student is of a certain age that they know how to use digital tools. I have found myself focusing a lot on basic skills with my students to fill the gaps they have as compared to their contemporaries in higher-income neighborhoods and schools.

K-12 ESL teacher in the Hudson Valley, New York

That is quite a list! It

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That is quite a list! It strikes me that one of the most important things to remember in implementing technology in students' daily instruction is your statement "...many kids do not have access to computers, iDevices or the Internet at home." As with any other subject, there is the danger of assuming that students should know certain things when they in reality they have experience with it. This could be economical, cultural, regional, or for any other reason. As we get enthused with driving technology in our classes, thanks for reminding us to make sure everyone enjoys the ride!

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