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Latin Teacher

Strategies for Success

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Hi Jaclyn,

For the past 2 years at my schools grade-level groups of teachers have been meeting 2x a week during the school day for what we call Strategies for Success. It was a difficult and controversial decision in our school to get to cluster teams (grade level teams who mostly teach the same students). But it has been personally great for my teaching and connecting to others' classrooms. We are working on an end-of-the-year, cross-disciplinary project for our 10th graders. I am very excited to embark on it and am hoping to align our curricula in the future to include more of these projects. That's how we do it.

Pre-K Special Education Teacher Brooklyn, New York

This is a great article that

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This is a great article that relates to my current studies in grad. school. It is so important to collaborate amongst all colleagues not just the ones whom are in your subject department. I believe there is no stopping when to comes to collaboration. It comes in many forms and many places. Depending on what you seek to learn while collaborating, you can collaborate with new and old teachers alike. For example, if I am seeking to adapt a new behavior plan for a student I would collaborate with any colleague at any level, not just the preschool teachers.
Point being, I believe you said it best by saying, "deep learning comes from pool of talents, resources and experiences to manimize coherence, relevance and connections". I personally wish my school offered more support and time for collaboration but that is where I can benefit from these blogs!

Assistant Principal of Curriculum Development

I agree with Dave Saner

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I agree with Dave Saner concerning School Librarians overarching view of the curriculum and the vital support they can provide in collaborating with teachers when planning inquiry based learning projects. During the many years I taught in the NYC school system I always collaborated with the School Librarian when planning collaborative and cooperative units throughout my teaching experience.

Administrator, author and educator

Who's On First?

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Jaclyn:

I wrote this article from the perspective that teachers should take the initiative. As an acting principal, if a teacher comes to me with a request, I try to accommodate them if I agree. However, from the perspective of school leadership, the principal should be the prime motivator in setting up these collaborations, providing time and providing support. I consulted for a program called Mix-It-Up out of Texas State University, that trains principals to support math and science teacher collaboration. http://www.cose.txstate.edu/mathematics/mixitup/

Ben Johnson
San Antonio, Texas

Administrator, author and educator

Multiplying learning power

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Nikisha:

Certainly teachers need to look at learning styles, but, perhaps most importantly, individual teachers, working by themselves, find it daunting to try to reach all of their students. But when two or more teachers work together, then the team has time to customize lessons for individual learning styles, RTI and other differentiation. I view it as a win -win both student and teacher benefit from teacher collaboration.

Ben Johnson
San Antonio, Texas

Middle School Special Education Teacher in Tennessee

Are educators embracing the new educational approaches?

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As I read this particular article, I visualized my experiences into my elementary classroom where it was the educator’s way or no way. Never once did the educator consider Jane’s and Johnny’s learning styles (cooperative learning, visuals/tangible items, use of another content, etc.). As a result, many students turned off their education. As I fast forward today into education, you still have a few laggard educators who are continuing down this familiar approach. This is very interesting due in part to the common core educational shift that will grace majority of the country in 2013-2014. If the aim of education is to fully activate the cognitive potential of the learner, ways have to be found to integrate knowledge from many subjects to achieve a fuller understanding than would be provided by content treated in isolation (Hickman & Kiss, 2010). With this in mind, this blog addresses the collaboration of different content area teachers to plan lessons effectively together. In preparation for the future, students need to be taught to make links and transfer skills from one area to another (Hickman &Kiss, 2010). With this cross-curricular approach, students will then turn back on to education and take an active role within their learning. Cross-curricular discussions are sometimes said to allow students to talk through many voices, expressing their own ideas and interpretations (Hickman & Kiss, 2010). I will continue to follow this approach as well as listen to the many pros and cons to this educational shift. I will continue to provide additional insist to this particular blog.

References:
Hickman, R., & Kiss, L. (2010). Cross-Curricular Gallery Learning: A Phenomenological Case Study. International Journal Of Art & Design Education, 29(1), 27-36.

This is an excellent article.

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This is an excellent article. The question remains, however: Whose responsibility is it to provide this time for teachers? When will be be able to look at education as a whole and redesign the approach to the year's schedule and to staff PD to accomodate these needs, without new mandates constantly flowing in? I have been exploring this topic of teacher de-isolation lately (http://soulstrikers.wordpress.com/) and would love to hear how schools are doing this successfully.

I am the Director of Library Services for the Denver Public Schools

Librarians and Collaboration

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School librarians have an overarching view of the curriculum and are in a great place to see connections between various areas. They can be pivotal in working on shared planning and creation of integrated instruction. School librarians are strong partners in inquiry based learning of all types.

Living this culture at UCDS in Seattle

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Read about collaboration at UCDS in this recently republished article... http://www.hightechhigh.org/unboxed/issue9/finding_inspiration_from_down...

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