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elementary tech teacher

Government - Business, and the big difference is ?

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Neither one has Education as a primary purpose. The first's goal is to take money via taxes and then send it back to the public minus a substantial fee. The second is to attempt to make money and somehow keep the first group from taking it.

The prime problem with the "common core" standards is they drive the school districts to use "boxed" curriculum sets. This year our 5th grade and 2nd grade teachers are being forced to use 4 new boxed curriculums - Mandated by Government [ I view State Departments of Educations as government ] these are sold by business. If you look at these Math Curriculums - they are so awful, but hey, they "align with the Common Core" so they must be great.

Well, just maybe, the standards from the "core" are actually flawed and we are again following the herd of bureaucrats and visionaries who "know what's best". One thing for sure - The pressure has been applied and all children will be learning exactly the same "items", excepting the private school students who will as always learn concepts, deal with knowledge, writing and get into the better colleges. Teachers now are going 4 years of Education courses to find out they are to read the scripted lessons from the boxes curriculums. Might as well get bums from the street to read the lessons. Ooops, shouldn't have made that suggestion! ROFL

Next year we are going to TEST to death all the students again, but this time the children are going to have to type all the essays. So, the Common Core won't actually be tested but rather the typing abilities of 2nd - 5th graders. It will be easier for the government to grade the tests.

Randy and Dwayne - are you fellows IN the schools or working at something else? Maybe Government or Business ? I know you are experts.... Just wondering at what?

elementary tech teacher

Common Core

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Thanks Dwayne for the reply. Thank goodness someone is thinking. Here is where the core leads an educator. I WAS teaching a text based programming language, with great interest and success to 3-5th graders. Parents loved it. Aided in keyboarding, critical thinking, organized thought.
But then it became clear - That is not in the standards !! You can't teach that !!

I was teaching 1st and 2nd graders how to tie their shoes. Spatial intelligence, a practical life long skill that also builds self esteem. The administrators saw it in my lesson plans and guess what - Right, that is not in the standards.

I guess the business leaders don't think programing computers or tying your shoes in the morning has value. However, I don't see too many adults wearing velcro shoes, but hey, its only a matter of time.

Maybe this doesn't fit your definition of a solid data set, but are you a teacher? I actually teach 700 students once every 8 calendar days.

Teaching Artist, Choreographer, and Dancer

Stop, Breathe, Look Closer

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Hey, When will teachers actually question the great wisdom of the government workers that create this "CORE"? Its amazing how smart, educated teachers with advanced degrees go lock step with anything that the experts dictate, question NOTHING and then blindly teach to the test, that we create as a benchmark. WE HAVE LOST OUR WAY !! LOL!!

These standards truly are fundamentally different from any that have come before. Many of the differences are, I think, positive. If you look more closely, you will see what Jay McTighe is getting at.

Another reader has already pointed out your error about "government" involvement in the process. But the question we all should be asking is whether we want business to continue to drive educational outcomes.

In the past, we had the factory system of education thrust on us by factory owners who wanted workers trained on the public dime to come labor in industry after graduation. That led to the "one size fits no one" system that we use to this day, in which we try to make sure that each child meets the "standard" for education.

Now what we should saying is that the best outcomes for our children are not driven by what kind of job they will have, but rather by what it takes to be a citizen of the 21st Century world. We don't specify which facts they know, but we clarify the kind of thinking they need to be able to do with the facts they do have. We show, by example and guidance, how to learn and --- even more importantly --- how to remain in learning mode all our lives.

This will definitely help everyone be better, more productive workers. But the purpose of public education should not be to feed business the raw materials for their profit-making, but to prepare children to be the best people they can be.

Bruce, It wasn't government

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Bruce,
It wasn't government workers that wrote the common core. It was authored by a large group of business leaders across the nation. They used the standard sets from all 50 states to determine the most rigorous demands currently in use and started with those, in other words, their jumping off point was the best of what was available. After the initial authoring it has been farmed out to teacher groups, schools, districts and volunteers across the nation for vetting, revision and feedback purposes for years (I think 3, but don't quote me there). Over that time the structure of the standards, the language of the standards and a lot of the meat of the core was revamped and rewritten dozens of times. From all of that came what we now have. In reality, it is the great wisdom (and great reserach) of those business leaders and those thousands of teachers and educators that put together the common core. I don't see why anyone would want to question such wisdom, or at least not so without a solid data set that disproves the effectiveness of the wisdom. But maybe I am missing something...

elementary tech teacher

Technology Educator

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Hey, When will teachers actually question the great wisdom of the government workers that create this "CORE"? Its amazing how smart, educated teachers with advanced degrees go lock step with anything that the experts dictate, question NOTHING and then blindly teach to the test, that we create as a benchmark. WE HAVE LOST OUR WAY !! LOL!!

6th grade Language Arts/Social Studies teacher, Moreno Valley, CA

Yes, many are not backwards

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Yes, many are not backwards mapping and relying heavily on pacing guides. I understand the independent transfer, project based learning and inquiry, but what would be a first step for grade levels/single subjects to begin? Especially, those who rely heavily on pacing guides and multiple choice tests?

Thanks

Teacher, Computer Programmer / Engineer, and Educational Technologist

Some of us have been doing

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Some of us have been doing this all along. I think this is just plain good advice, Common Core or not.

(Then again, I just noticed this post was by Jay McTighe, who provided guidance, assistance, and advice as I was working as a curriculum developer for middle school computer classes at MCPS about 7-8 years ago. So no surprises here! Jay, are some people STILL not backwards-mapping??!)

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Jay McTighe education author and consultant

In this Series

In this series, authors Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins explore five big ideas about the Common Core State Standards and their translation into a curriculum. The goal of this series is to clear up misunderstandings and offer recommendations for designing a coherent curriculum and assessment system for realizing the standards' promise.

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