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Math Mom & Education Advocate

Knee-deep in CCSS

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I'm knee-deep in the Common Core State Standards with my business partner (and Little Brother) creating a site to support parents with the math portion. It's called That Math! and it's at www.thatsmath.com.

Strangely enough, we live in Texas where the Common Core State Standards don't apply. But we read each standard carefully to figure out where parents can plug in math to their daily world.

It's enlightening to read and see what's expected of our children. And it's overwhelming to think about how I didn't understand some of those concepts until I was in graduate school - in math!

>This connectedness between

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>This connectedness between grade levels is a welcome departure from some previous state standards that jumped from topic to topic, addressing a particular skill one year, dropping it the next, and returning to it later on or not at all.

Actually, we've documented plenty of instances where such ``disconnectedness'' makes portions of Common Core an awkward mess...among other critiques.

http://ccssimath.blogspot.com

Gifted Education Specialist

I'm curious about this. Do

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I'm curious about this. Do you mind sharing where you are (just the state)?

Rocky Mountain western state

You mention "leveling the playing field" and that can happen by holding back the gifted as much as it can happen my moving the struggling learners forward. It's easier. according to some people, to put a ceiling on what the brightest and most facile learners can access.

The forgotten language art

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I hope it changes our thinking about the standard that never gets mentioned, speaking. Overlooked in yet another post about the CCSS, oral communication needs some attention and our students need some direct attention. I wrote about it here: http://www.hmheducation.com/commoncore/teach-speaking.php and I offer help here: www.pvlegs.com

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

Hi Becky- I'm curious about

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Hi Becky-
I'm curious about this. Do you mind sharing where you are (just the state)? It seems like there are giant differences in the way the CCSS are playing out from state to state, which undermines the basic idea of the standards- leveling the playing field. I don't see anything in the standards themselves that would make this an outcome, but obviously there's some element of state or local policy that's creating an environment in which this occurs. I'd love to see someone do a bit of research into the differences in the ways states are setting up their policies around the CC. For example, in New Hampshire, a local control state, the impact is fairly small except that it's allowing teachers to use more progressive, constructivist methods. Sounds like just the opposite is happening for you!

It seems like, in this case, it isn't the CCSS to blame- it's state or local policy makers. I'd love to hear more about your situation though.

Gifted Education Specialist

So far in our schools it

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So far in our schools it means that really advanced students who used to be able to access accelerated curriculum are now chained to their desks with birthdate being the most important deciding factor dictating what they can access. Swell.

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

For us, this is the key

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For us, this is the key piece:
"Instead, they have the potential to support classrooms where complex reading, writing, and critical thinking is everyday work in nearly every part of the country. Places where students question the author, evaluate claims and evidence, and consider multiple perspectives. We don’t know much about how, exactly, the assessments will look, but they promise to match the kinds of higher-order skills demanded by the standards."

A lot of the teachers I work with have spent most of the careers under a "test is best" philosophy of education. The shift from test prep to the kind of learning described here (because if this is how they're going to assess, we'd better be teaching that way too!). Many remember being able to foster critical thinking and habits of mind (and I'm amazed at how many managed to hold on to their pedagogical souls during the NCLB years), but we're getting more and more inquiries from folks who want to use our Critical Skills Program as a way to move forward not only with Common Core, but also with returning to quality pedagogy.

Thanks for this great summary of what the standards are going to bring. Lindsey Fuller also wrote a good short piece on this subject too: http://www.6thgradetales.com/2012/11/5-ways-common-core-will-change-your...

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