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Pre-K teacher in Baltimore City

Thank you Dr. Curwin. I will

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Thank you Dr. Curwin. I will definitely try the private compliments. As far as the students who are not mentioned we acknowledge them for doing the right thing as soon as they correct the behavior which is almost immediately with me because I teach Pre-K and at that age they want to please you and be acknowledged but I will definitely try the private compliments. Thank you again.

Director, Graduate program in behavior disorder, David Yellin College

I really like the strategy

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I really like the strategy that teach b-more mentioned. I have been using it for over 20 years, but I find that saying these things to students privately works so much better than publicly. It's embarrassing to the students, both good and bad, to be mentioned in front of the whole class. Also, those students who never get mentioned feel resentful. Have you ever been in a class where some students get public recognition but you never did? If so, how did you feel about that class or the teacher? Private communication is the cornerstone of effective discipline. Thanks for the idea and I hope you try it privately and see how much better the class runs.

I'm a teaching assistant in

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I'm a teaching assistant in an international school. It is true that we want to show respect to those students who don't behave but we also fear that others will do the same, so sometimes I'm not sure what is the proper response. I tried "use humor" before and it worked very well. I will try other "do's and don'ts" to improve my classroom management skill. Thank you for sharing and I do benefit a lot.

Pre-K teacher in Baltimore City

I really enjoyed reading this

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I really enjoyed reading this blog and I completely agree with you. At the school I currently work at, we try to focus on the student who is doing the right thing by narrating to the student that is doing the right thing. This is one of Lee Cantors methods. For example if Tom, Sarah and Jacob are doing the right thing and Fred and Mary are not, the thing is to focus on what the first three are doing right that the last two are doing wrong. Tom is sitting ready and his eyes are on me, Sarah has her book turned to page 1 and her eyes are on me and Jacob is focused, his paper and pencil are on his desk to take notes. Once you have narrated to a few students who are doing the right thing, the hope is that the other students will use this opportunity to get themselves together. If they do not then you do one or 2 more things. Either way this keeps confrontation and classroom disruptions to a minimum as well as gives the teacher an opportunity to repeat her directions to the students.

I really liked this blog and

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I really liked this blog and the Do's and Don'ts . I am a second grade teacher and have one student in particular that is a handful. I plan on trying these steps to see if anything changes in the behavior. Thanks!

Florida

Good list of things to avoid.

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Good list of things to avoid.

Director, Graduate program in behavior disorder, David Yellin College

Thank you Steve for raising

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+2

Thank you Steve for raising an important point. I should have said under "don'ts" to avoid sarcasm at all times. The comments you mention have been used by many teachers who I've taught over a long period of time, and I have used them myself. They have never been perceived as sarcastic. The problem is that any comment to a student can be seen as loving or hateful depending on three factors which cannot be put into print; tone, intent and the relationship a teacher has with a student.
Students can aways tell when a teacher is being sincere or sarcastic so it is always wise to understand these three conditions before any interaction with students. Thanks for alerting us to this important issue.

I'd recommend staying away

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I'd recommend staying away from sarcastic answers like #3 and #4.

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