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Community Manager at Edutopia

MissRachelGoss, you should

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MissRachelGoss, you should definitely check out the cornucopia that is Edutopia's page dedicated to Open Educational Resources:

http://www.edutopia.org/open-educational-resources-guide

There's also a recent discussion on the site where people have been sharing their favorite free resources:

http://www.edutopia.org/groups/community-bulletin-board/600381

Senior Early Childhood and Special Education Major

I believe that in the current

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I believe that in the current day, having knowledge of technology can set you apart in your instruction. Although I do not think that every classroom needs an iPad cart, most teachers have access to the internet. Recently, I had the opportunity to attend the Pennsylvania Council for Exceptional Children's Conference. One of the sessions presented a website generated by Bloomsburg College. This website presents some of the best FREE web resources for teachers. Each website comes with a description and has been reviewed and rated by teachers and preservice teachers. Some of the websites are extremely useful. For example, ViewPure allows you to type in the URL to a youtube and will filter the page so that no advertisements or other video links appear. Check out this useful website at http://topteachertools.com/index.html. Does anyone else have any good online resources?

Secondary-Special Education Teacher

I've just returned from the

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I've just returned from the Learning Disabilities Association of America's Conference in San Antonio. In my session, I presented guidelines for policies and procedures governing clasroom use, along with guidelines to select age appropriate apps with activities as to how I use the apps to support my curricula.

I distributed a 14 page handout on these subjects for attendees to use as examples. Attending my session were representatives from private and charter schools, school districts, teachers, and educational consultants from all areas of the United States and several foreign countries. They were so surprised at my easy, straight forward approach.

The lesson that I learned from this experience is that we are all in the same mode of digital exploration for classroom use. Sharing with each other is the key to success. I'm glad that I had the opportunity to share what I learned with others.

If anyone in our group would like to receive a copy of my handouts, I will email them to you. Just send me an email to: joannap@svacademy.org and I will forward these pages to you.

2nd grade teacher in Las Vegas, Nv.

We are just getting tablets

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We are just getting tablets into our school. I'm looking forward to using those along with any other technology to teach my students with. I believe in alternative assessment methods. I think that by giving students the chance to use technology their recall methods will improve especially in ELA activities. I currently am a D5/Cafe teacher and am looking for ways to bring more technology into these lessons.

Administrator online campus operations software

Inexpensive way to get more teaching time in class

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Tablets are not only for learning but can be used for administration purposes. This relieves to teacher to teach and students to learn. A tap of a student ID smart card takes attendance in the classroom plus can perform many other functions.
http://www.scholarchip.com/OurStory.aspx

I believe a good balance

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I believe a good balance point for technology integration is this question:
Does this technology add to or bring to life an aspect of reality in a way that cannot be done through any other method? Does it add meaning that could not be seen or experienced any other way? Example: Augmented Reality Apps layer information in real time on top of live images or three dimensional physical structures. Not all of them are useful or even practical for education, but many of them do add depth to our understanding of the universe, anatomy or history. There are some technologies that bring reality into the classroom in ways never before possible and, when combined with interactive surface technologies like touch screens and interactive projectors, allow students to explore rather than just see. So, with that in mind, does it make more sense to spend less on SmartBoards and projectors that really only allow a minimal number of students to interact at once and more on mobile devices that alllow all students to interact, think and explore?

TeacherGraph

This is a great post. I think

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This is a great post. I think it's important to provide educational materials for parents to keep up with the students' progress in technology. Parents should at least be aware of how their kids are using the internet, tools, software, etc. I think parents can keep up with technology if the schools and teachers provide them the opportunity to engage.

Sincerely,
Tony
http://teachergraph.com

Secondary-Special Education Teacher

Digital Divide and Student Progress

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I work with special education students who have learning disabilities and high functioning autism. After weeks of selling the idea, my school bought several iPad minis as part of a pilot program to determine teaching and learning effectiveness.

I've been pioneering this in my Language Arts class. With the few minis that I had in my classroom, the school's network greatly slowed down. It was determined by our IT guy that we needed a WIFI network just for my classroom. Now, I can have all my students work independently and nothing happens to the school's other networks. It didn't take $$ to make this transition-- just time for the IT guy to develop a new network for my class.

I'm getting great results with the students accepting the technology and apps to help them in writing research papers. I'm glad we are making the transition---one step at a time.

Educational Psychologist and Consultant at Lori Day Consulting

Byron, that's a really great

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Byron, that's a really great point I had not considered. Thanks for making it.

Bandwidth

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This article brings up a good point about the additional costs once a tablet is in the students hands. Further the biggest issue for school districts moving forward is the lack of bandwidth! In California, there are rumblings from the state department of education about a desire to have a minimum bandwidth of 20Mbps per student to support the launching of online testing. If we put a tablet in every students hand then we also have to invest in the infrastructure. I work at a school site that has a very high ratio of computers to students, but students are unable to use some software because of low bandwidth. Our school knows it needs to increase its bandwidth, but it’s a costly endeavor and are schools willing to invest a large amount of money when they don’t have it to begin with?

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