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Director, Graduate program in behavior disorder, David Yellin College

Hi Elana, Thanks for your

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Hi Elana,

Thanks for your comments and including your dog in your picture. I am a great dog lover. One of my dogs once literally saved my life.

Thanks also for your helpful suggestion and tools

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

We work with The Bully

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We work with The Bully Project (http://www.thebullyproject.com/) at times and while I was on the call with them, the Director of the documentary "Bully," mentioned a great activity that may be a useful way to reach out to students:

Activity: In a staff lounge, map out all of your students' names. Every teacher marks with a sticky dot if they've reached out to the student or made a connection with them at some point. Once all teachers have done this, you'll start to identify those that are in need and those that have lots of support.

Here's a link to their educator toolkit that has this activity and more: http://www.thebullyproject.com/tools_educators.

Faced with

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Faced with challenges..
Student's today are faced with more challenges than when our grandparents were children. Society is more vulnerable and access to means of doing the wrong thing are readily available. We as educators should want to come up with the times to reach out to student's. This does not mean that we compromise the main principle for teaching and educating. We have to utilize all resources to keep students engaged in learning and in getting them to value their own self worth. Going to school for our grandparents or great grandparents was an honor. Many students know that many great leaders of the past had a limited education and were successful. With that in mind, some students feel they can make it without having twelve years of education and beyond. So taking the notion that we as educators only need to cater to the students that can comprehend the lesson easily and want to learn is closing the door on those that are struggling to learn.

I tend to agree that we as

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I tend to agree that we as educators need to do more to reach students. I have found that taking the time out to speak with students on a one on one can make a huge difference in what is happening in that students life. Yes, we as parents should be more actively involved in our children's lives. However, with the demands that are placed on many parents at their jobs, they are unable to give more of themselves to their children's education, which is sad. Yet, as educator's we should want to reach the student that seems to be unreachable. Our jobs are to develop, educate and we have to always keep in mind that all students are able to learn.

Agreed!

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Having someone believe that you are able to succeed, matters in so many ways..

Staff Development Teacher

Absolutely!

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Absolutely!

Staff Development Teacher

This is not a quick fix!

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This article inculcates the idea educators must meet the student where he or she is currently, then teach- which is what we SHOULD be doing. I think we as a society do not see our students as 'whole people', but rather an assembly line. Teaching and learning is a process, not a checklist. We are charged with developing our students, but we are failing, especially as parents of these kids and who are the first in line to be charged with this huge responsibility. As an educator in a public school system, the challenge is not the student, but uninvolved and unmotivated parents- there is no excuse because these are our kids.

Life Skills Support Teacher

The Bigotry of Lowered Expectations?

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I am in this profession to improve the lives of children as well. However, I wish to dispel the notion that educational policy in America doesn't have to comport to only serve the needs of underachieving urban students. There are millions of kids out in the cities, suburbs, and rural areas who are achieving and getting along very well with the models contributors to this blog routinely impugn. Why should they be ignored simply because they are able to prosper?

I'll again reiterate an ugly reality of the American political scene that few wish to acknowledge ... dependent underclasses exist because certain politicians need them to remain in power. Intact family units, the core of any strong society, have been allowed to disintegrate because so-called "progressive" social policies have made it easy to do so. Irresponsibility is encouraged.

If you want to save children, save families first. Restore mother AND father head of households. Then you wouldn't need to have teachers play parents all day.

I don't need research to back that up. I see it play out every single day.

Director, Graduate program in behavior disorder, David Yellin College

The posts I write are

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The posts I write are hopefully entertaining and helpful to educators, but my real motivation to write is to shed a light that will eventually make an improvement in the lives of children. That has been the theme of my life's work. I encourage and welcome all feedback and discussion, even disagreement, because that is how we all learn. Ideas need to be shared, challenged and examined through the lens of what is best for children. What is not welcome or acceptable, in my view, is name calling, assumptions made about contributors or anything that is unprofessional. I really enjoy Edutopia for the professionalism in its members. So let's put all ideas on the table and leave insulting and personal remarks to faculty rooms where they seem to flourish.

Thank you

NBCT, science educator

Seriously....?

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Quote:

This is not the America that my forefathers fought and died for. That's not the America my relatives risked their lives to escape to during times of war, either.Your approach only weakens and softens the minds and bodies of youth, invariably killing the spirit that made America, its citizens, and its culture, exceptional.

Mr. Hauck- your comments do not surprise me at all. Such comments are not supported by current research nor my own experiences in the classroom w/o walls. I just read a good book called Stratosphere by Michael Fullan which addresses several principles related to creating an environment in which creativity and innovation can take place. Fullen addresses Teesa Amabile's and Steven Kramer's idea called the "Progress Principle." The foundation of this principle is that creating an environment which fosters joy in learning through engagement and creative work. "Workers who produced more were intrinsically motivated when small progress was reported and not extrinsically motivated by recognitions or reward systems."

Like Dr. Curwin, I'm not here to convince you of my choice in instructional pedagogy. Using ineffective methods based on OLD education models doesn't work for me personally. If they work for you GREAT!

Your comment on how your education model "Made America" is a matter of perspective. Indigenous peoples have a different perspective related to the government educational system which was imposed on them, denied them of their history, and culture. I could share more details on the impact Native American Boarding Schools sponsored by the U.S Government but that would ruin the purpose of this discussion.

I chose to use a pedagogy that values the culture, heritage, and practices of my students. Imposing Western models of education and ineffective business strategies from the 1960's would dishonor the history of my students, be irresponsible, and ineffective. Sure there was progress as a result of these models but progress for WHO?

My students do well in balancing the needs of the modern world with the responsibility they have to their community. This is what I love teaching population of students who have been historically oppressed by the models you shared with us. Don't teach a student about plants, teach them how to grow the plants so they can feed themselves. They take pride in this learning because it is purposeful and challenging work that supports creativity and innovation. There is no need to "bait" them with paper that contains the faces of dead presidents; they will learn when they find the experience to be an extension of themselves.

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