Comments (36)

Comment RSS
Touch typing enthusiast and educator

Here is a list of free typing

Was this helpful?
0

Here is a list of free typing practice websites for kids:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/typing/
http://www.typingweb.com/
http://www.ratatype.com/

touch typing or keyboarding

Was this helpful?
0

touch typing or keyboarding as you call it should be a mandatory subject for all kids in school!

cheap computers (not verified)

computer skills

Was this helpful?
0

I think as students become comfortable with these basics, other skills can be taught. Many skills can be incrementally learned in the third and fourth grades. The left and right margins in Microsoft Word by default are unusually wide therefore, students should be taught to change the margins

cheap computers (not verified)

I think they are giving best

Was this helpful?
0

I think they are giving best technology training for keyboarding because without the basic ability to type quickly and accurately, getting your ideas and data into a computer can take a lot of time and can be frustrating.

cheap computers (not verified)

It a basic technology

Was this helpful?
0

It a basic technology training workshop of keyboarding. It helps the students in many ways who have problems in these basic skills. It is really useful.

cheap computers (not verified)

It makes easier and important

Was this helpful?
0

It makes easier and important the basic worship of key-boarding technology training. It has many enjoyable benefits for students who have problems in keyboarding.

Computer Repair (not verified)

Thanks

Was this helpful?
0

An interesting and informative post. Thanks for sharing this info blog.

Julie Arbuckle (not verified)

Typing Tutor Lessons 3 and 4

Was this helpful?
0

I would love to take advantage of your offer to access of Lessons 3 and 4 of Typing Tutor to teachers that you posted on the educoptic.org web page. I realize that you offered this in 2006 but I did not begin teaching in the elementary level until 2006. My school is slowly moving in the direction of providing technology education in the lower grades; however, we are a small rural school (a graduating class size between 50 and 75) with very limited funds. Our school did update the computer lab at the elementary school providing 30 new computers. But personnel and software programs are difficult to procure. I myself am employed on a part-time basis. I was moved from the high school to the elementary school and am struggling to provide lessons to such young children. I can see the enormous benefits of using your enjoyable and pertinent lessons to my Kindergarten students and am requesting lessons 3 and 4 to help teach these younger students the keyboard. If I am successful, the Board would possibly be more willing to release additional funds that I can use to perhaps purchase additional programs you author.

jane (not verified)

The importance of basic computer skills

Was this helpful?
0

Most of my students can enter in a "text" message faster than most adults can type.

They didn't need a software program to teach them.

jane
dallas, texas

Des Howell (not verified)

I would like to comment on

Was this helpful?
0
I would like to comment on Kathryn Peyton's (September 15, 2006) proposition that " the whole spreadsheet concept is a little too abstract for the middle school brain." Yes, the WHOLE concept is a bit "abstract", if you mean the typical sets of personal constructs that adults have about spreadsheets. I suggest that we take a Piagetian approach and first observe the "mistakes" (as adults see them) that young people make when they begin to use spreadsheets. These may help you see spreadsheets from a child's point of view. For example, I recently introduced spreadsheets to a Year Four class by suggesting these would be a good way to explore pentimos. As usual, I did not talk much about spreadsheets per se , I simply showed the students how to make the worksheet cells roughly square shaped and fill them with colours. The kids quickly got the hang of this. I overheard one of them saying very happily, "I haven't played this [computer?] game before!" To the adult mind, spreadsheets are not games, but what are they to children before we impose the definitions that we have learnt as adults mainly in courses for adults or by reading spreadsheet manuals and listening to other adult opinions? (Consider this: Spreadsheets existed as a way of problem-solving long before business people invented the name. Even VisiCalc was not officially "a spreadsheet program" until its Tandy version came out.) My theory (based on my reading about the origins of VisiCalc and my observations of students) is that spreadsheets are best defined (if you must define them) as multi-purpose software that can be used in basically three ways: (a) Like a piece of paper (b) Like a handheld calculator and (c) Like a programming language. Nowadays, we "program" computers in lots of different ways, not just the traditional method of making a list of instructions for computers to follow. Personally, I think of using spreadsheet functions as a way of programming by describing mathematical and logical relations in a problem situation. Concepts like these can be readily learnt gradually by young students. Think in terms of practical exercises rather than explanations. Build on what they already know (e.g. problem solving using pencil and paper) . Take a long-term approach over the length of the Middle phase of their schooling. Do it as part of "ordinary" lessons, right across the curriculum, rather than in special ICT lessons based on Adult short courses in spreadsheeting. I look forward to the day when more teachers consider spreadsheets as yet another tool for "scaffolding" alongside other options such pencils and paper and calculators. This is using spreadsheets constructively as "Mindtools" to teach problem-solving, creative thinking, etc , if you want a label for it. It works for me and my students are having a lot of fun.
see more see less