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Teacher and Educational Journalist

Thanks Carrie, especially for

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Thanks Carrie, especially for what you're doing as a coach!

Middle School PE teacher in California

Great reading!! You bring up

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Great reading!!
You bring up a topic that is more true nowadays then ever before I think. I am a coach as well as a teacher and I am just amazed at the difference between kids now and when I was growing up. At least where I teach, it seems like so many students feel that everything is owed to them for their greatness. They act like they are above everyone else. Many of them are involved in sports and are constantly told by their parents that sports are going to take them far. A lot of them forget to enforce the importance of school and at least teach them to have a back up plan if their athletic dreams don't work out. As a coach, I am always stressing the importance of school and figuring out what your plan is going to be outside of sports. I also teach them to be humble in everything they do! Thank you for your post on this topic, It is nice to know others are thinking about it too!

Teacher and Educational Journalist

Brad -Thanks!

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What a thoughtful and insightful comment. I hadn't thought about that and it is right on target.

What I described in my column is, in someways, the tip of a very important iceberg. What you describe is something every teacher and parent should be aware of and be able to, at the very least, compensate for and include in their mentoring process.

Thanks again.

Mark

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As one struggling with OCPD (a bit different than OCD), I am able to relate with the story described above. Sometimes when we believe that we are worthless in our youth, there is one activity in which we find meaning because we experience some success. This singular activity tends to control our lives thereafter disabling us from experiencing worth in any other life pursuit. Many of us feel this way about our religious faith struggling to find identity outside of it. Thus, while hero worship certainly applies to those who are esteemed highly on the basketball court, it can certainly also apply to those who experience meaning, purpose, and worth in other endeavors causing disequilibrium, imbalance, and myopia.

As one struggling with OCPD

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As one struggling with OCPD (a bit different than OCD), I am able to relate with the story described above. Sometimes when we believe that we are worthless in our youth, there is one activity in which we find meaning because we experience some success. This singular activity tends to control our lives thereafter disabling us from experiencing worth in any other life pursuit. Many of us feel this way about our religious faith struggling to find identity outside of it. Thus, while hero worship certainly applies to those who are esteemed highly on the basketball court, it can certainly also apply to those who experience meaning, purpose, and worth in other endeavors causing disequilibrium, imbalance, and myopia.

Great topic. Good points.

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I've often thought about this. Being the "star" carries much responsibility. As you pointed out, for those to whom popularity comes from on-field prowess, there is little incentive to hone social skills. There is always someone else clamoring to be near.
It's part of the answer to, "why are the mean kids the popular kids?"

Teacher and Educational Journalist

Addendum

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The film version of "Friday Night Lights" is readily available on DVD and Blu-Ray. The real life coach, Gary Gaines, played by Billy Bob Thornton, taught his players that "Football is not life. Life is what comes before and after." He did a great job of preparing his players for a life beyond stardom.

http://www.universalstudiosentertainment.com/friday-night-lights/

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