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High School Teacher

I will be starting one-to-one

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I will be starting one-to-one next year and had already considered flipping as a means of creating more time in a traditional mathematics classroom. What many people don't consider is what to do with the time you've created (the whole point of flipping a classroom). Problem based learning offers a viable enrichment of curriculum which will help students dig deeper within content and develop those 21st century skills we keep hearing about. I'm glad I stumbled upon this article. Thanks!

Community Manager at Edutopia

Elizabeth, here is the blog

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Elizabeth, here is the blog post on modifying the flipped classroom that Jennifer mentioned:

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-classroom-in-class-version-jennifer...

Blogger at Cult of Pedagogy

Elizabeth -- Funny you should

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Elizabeth -- Funny you should mention this, because since I posted my question a while back, I also started working on a similar arrangement, and Edutopia will be putting up an article and video about it in just a few days. Please jump onto the comments when it comes up and link readers again to your post, since you offer a slightly different perspective on the issue.
p.s. -- I like your blog!

I use a process I call

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I use a process I call "flipping then re-flipping" the classroom. Basically, this means I set up engaging online lessons, then have my students do them in class. This works for several reasons, but most importantly, it requires me to streamline my lecture. What might have taken me 30 minutes now takes me 5 or 10. Also, I have found that it minimizes "group effect," meaning that when students are watching my videos, they feel I am speaking directly to them as opposed to a whole class. Here is a blog post I wrote about this. http://elizabethvenegas.blogspot.com/2014/02/the-flipped-then-re-flipped...

Host and Co-Creator of Virtual Science University

I kind of agree with Jan

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I kind of agree with Jan Felton that students these days are very much involved with technology. I have to disagree with him on point #5 Consider Tech Equity and agree with Andrew Millier. Not all can show the magic of the technology because not all can afford it. Flipping your PBL Classroom is a fun rewarding experience! How do I know? I have put it into practice in my actual Anatomy & Physiology-Biology Classes.

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

It combines traditional

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It combines traditional classroom knowledge with real-world expertise and skills to better prepare students for success. Project-based learning puts the teacher into more of a facilitator role that allows for greater dialogue with each individual student.

Secondary Education student in Chicago

Good article and good

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Good article and good suggestions from the commenters, too. But the term "flipped classroom" looks to me like one of those buzzwords that is beginning to lose its usefulness as it is applied to more and more activities. To me, #1 sounds like "flipping" (lectures at home, practice/procedural learning at school). The others describe various learning tasks for students to do at home... what used to be called homework.

Pre-Service Teacher at WKU SKyTeach Program, Kentucky

Short videos are definitely

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Short videos are definitely the way to go. If you're flipping, you are now competing with Xbox, Playstation, ESPN, reality TV, and whatever else the students have going on at home.

Videos need to be short and the more engaging they are, the better. When you're just starting out, production values don't necessarily need to be that high, but you will want to raise the quality level very quickly to keep the students "hooked."

You're now a media producer, and you must design accordingly.

K-5 Instructional Technology Specialist, Edcamper, Graduate Professor

Hi Jennifer, I know I've

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Hi Jennifer,
I know I've heard of some districts that will have loaner devices for students without access. Videos can be loaded onto the device if there's no home connectivity.

Producer LD Podcast, Digital Media Consultant, Author

Hi Jennifer! How many kids

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Hi Jennifer!

How many kids don't have access. do you know? In our district, some kids use phones, use computers at the library or community center after school, etc. kids without true access were much fewer than we presumed, mostly because even those without computers often had some access through cell phones instead. Some schools i know also have a few "lenders" that they let kids check out for some assignments and projects and there's been surprisingly few problems there as well.

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