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Blogger at Cult of Pedagogy

Hi Becky -- Yes, the people

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Hi Becky -- Yes, the people I've brainstormed with have mentioned that as a possibility, too. I would think that teachers and community members would have to do some planning, though, for things like transportation -- a lot of the same kids who don't have technology at home also catch the bus home right after school. Still, this seems like a good solution if the logistics could be worked out.

Has anyone ever tried "in-class" flipping? This would involve having some students "plugged in," watching tutorials or video lectures, while others did independent work, group work, or a teacher-led activity. It would require good planning ahead of time, and it would still consume some class time, but the advantage would be that students would get better quality one-on-one time with the teacher when they aren't watching the videos, and the teacher is still freed up from delivering the content in real time. Has anyone tried an arrangement like this?

Education Consultant

Hi Jennifer, I have not tried

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Hi Jennifer,

I have not tried this myself, but I'm wondering if you held time at the school library or in your classroom before or after school for students who either didn't have access to teach at home or just wanted to get their "home" work done in school. If the flipped classroom elements are optional, it only creates a problem if some students don't have any options to participate. If there was an option, like after school library time, it may help with that. However, I don't think flipped classroom is for every classroom, and if it becomes an issue of equity, it may not be a good fit. It's better to do all the digital work where all students can have access to the technology. Hope this helps!

Becky

Nex-gen Students and Tech

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Nex-gen Students and Tech Goes Hand-in-Hand

Students these days are very much involved with technology. So i don't totally agree with the point #5 Consider Tech Equity. Edtech is showing its magic everywhere now from kindergarten school to University. Though I agree with the fact that combination of PBL and Flipped Classroom can play well together when it comes to make learning fun and completing an assignment within a speculated time with ease.

Community Manager at Edutopia

Lynn, I've found that adults

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Lynn, I've found that adults can be a lot more rigid than kids in their conception of how to learn. One way to get around that rigidity is to take the power they hand you and turn it right back onto them...

Them: "You are the teacher. You are supposed to teach us."
You: "Yes, that's right. I am the teacher, and this is the best way to learn."

Also, all the rules about engaging learners apply to adults as much as they do to children.

Nursing Program Head

Any tips for how to get

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Any tips for how to get buy-in on the flipped classroom with students? My adult learners seem to only want the information told to them. I have tried bringing in WEB sites for discussion, divided into groups with activities and then class sharing, but one I did have many say that "You are the teacher" and "You are supposed to teach us". They don't get it that they are learning by doing these alternative things.

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

Hi Jennifer- I was just

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Hi Jennifer-
I was just having this conversation with another teacher (I happen to be married to him, so it was convenient) who was moving towards flipping. His school is making arrangements to check out technology to kids who need it so they can view the content at home on the nights they're trying to flip. It's not perfect- it still assumes wifi access at home, though I think some content could be preloaded onto the devices- but they feel strongly that between the kids who have access and the devices they can make available overnight (or over a weekend) they can get a device into everyone's hands.

Blogger at Cult of Pedagogy

Me again. New question about

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Me again. New question about tech equity (#5). This really seems to be a sticking point with flipping, and I still haven't found much out there that offers any real solutions. Making the flipping activities optional is certainly a way to circumvent the problem, but it seems that this arrangement will still ultimately put kids without tech access further behind. Has anyone out there found a way to make flipping work for kids who don't have home access, in a way that allows them to really participate?

Blogger at Cult of Pedagogy

Hi Andrew. I would like to

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Hi Andrew. I would like to echo the emphasis on "short" videos. Length really seems to make the difference in whether a video gets watched. If you have a lot of content, just break it up. People will happily watch 15 minutes of content if they only have to do it in 2-minute increments. Breaking material up this way also allows students to review precisely the parts they are not clear on, instead of having to scan through a longer video to find the right section. Making the most of this requires that each small section have a unique title. So instead of "Types of Rocks, Parts 1-3," call them "Igneous Rocks," "Sedimentary Rocks," and "Metamorphic Rocks."

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