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middle and high school Art teacher in Spain

Embrace a cohort model, where

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Embrace a cohort model, where teams of teachers and students work together.
Yes! It is possible but sometimes scary as that parallel mentioned in the DLMOOC. When this cohort model comes into play, the top down tiered managarial model looses power. Kids have so much to add to the planning and reflecting. If we can bring them on board and work WITH them rather than on them, success is only a heartbeat away!

A college student who loves self-directed learning

In high school, I was able to

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In high school, I was able to participate in pbl through Project Lead the Way. My favorite course from K-12 was our engineering design and development course. Here there were no boundaries or restrictions. I learned so much in that class! From my experiences, I received two mentors and an internship right out of high school. This paved the way for me to discover self-directed learning. One thing lead to another and I learned how to program. I now have an internship this coming summer in Kansas City as a Software Engineer.

Change of Heart

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I was completely moved after reading your blog. The first paragraph alone would have been enough to inspire me, but as I continued to read, I became more and more convinced to "Change the Subject" and incorporate project centered learning into my classroom, even if it meant that I had to change a lot of my old ways of doing things.

Recently there has been a lot of talk about Common Core standards. Project Based Learning, seems to fit right in with the objectives of CCSS. Especially the part of your blog that states, "Of necessity, they learn how to collaborate, how to plan, how to give and accept critique, how to revise, how to self-assess. They read complex texts and write a wide range of pieces for a variety of purposes, from personal reflections to news articles, project proposals, memos, research reports, stories, and essays." These are important skills and concepts that our students must have in order to be successful in the real world. In my classroom we've been working on these skills since the beginning of the year. It makes me smile each time I hear my students say the words "reflect", "collaborate", or "solution oriented". Even though it appeared that your information was more geared towards the secondary level, as a fourth grade teacher, I know first hand that these concepts can be and should be taught at all grade level.

I've been a principal of an

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I've been a principal of an EL school in Fort Collins, CO going on six years now. The most rewarding job in the world! Feel free to contact me with any questions. Just double click on my name under the "Staff" tab and it will take you to my email. http://polarisels.weebly.com/

Parent of 2, ms and college

Do you know of any in suffolk

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Do you know of any in suffolk county?

Thanks!

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S Tatel,

Thank you so much for posting the link to EL Schools. I was totally unaware of this organization and there happen to be a number of school within driving distance that I can visit to see the programs in action!

Our school is trying to great a more hands-on project based learning environment, but as with all changes there have been some bumps in the road.

Do you have experience with project based learning or EL schools?

Any advice for a school that is starting this journey??

Thanks!

Projects have been

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Projects have been incorporated into learning for a long time, but they are almost always made up exercises, and not real life accomplishments. When a project is something that will be done anyway, with coaching to ensure that the major principles were actually known and applied it is not only purposeful, it is expedient.

Literacy Coach and Title 1 Reading Teacher

Some schools ARE doing this:

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Some schools ARE doing this: Expeditionary Learning!! See http://elschools.org/

College & Career Counselor/Educational Consultant

Teaching students through

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Teaching students through projects and finding solutions to problems is certainly aligned with the constructivist view of learning. We can’t always anticipate outcomes in the real world and, therefore, learning by working to solve problems or create something provides the student with a similar environment. The outcomes would then be determined by a combination of the student’s perspective, past knowledge and experiences, and the challenge to be tackled (Ertmer & Newby, 1993). Though to AndrewGoodman15’s point, sometimes approaching a particular topic using a behaviorist or cognitive method might be the most appropriate.

This learning world of which you speak is very appealing. It would absolutely require a complete paradigm shift because, as you wrote in your posting, we are working in a centuries-old environment. The systems we have in place make it difficult to do anything but create more state assessments to judge students, teachers, and the districts as a whole. Assessing what students have learned via these metrics makes the paradigm shift seem impossible. Teaching to the test has become a necessity for many teachers, especially in English and Math. Where is the time for actual learning, for creating ways to facilitate that learning, and for the collaboration among educators you mentioned?

Ertmer, P. A., & Newby, T. J. (1993). Behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism: Comparing critical features from an instructional design perspective. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 6(4), 50-71.

As with a lot of things,

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As with a lot of things, where the rubber meets the road, in the classroom, this is difficult to implement, and often requires stepping back to a degree that a lot of us may be uncomfortable with. However, the paradigm is shifting, and we all need to embrace and change to suit the evolving needs of our students. The other side is I have noticed that some teachers forget there is still a role for direct instruction, especially when teaching new and unfamiliar concepts. Cheers All! Dr. Andy

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