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Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

@finleyjd -- You make an

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@finleyjd -- You make an AWESOME point. And you left me scratching my head a bit -- wondering why I didn't address a bit more in #5.

Needless to say, I completely agree. I think I was thinking that if you're new to Twitter you may want to follow like-minded people first but not necessarily.

Thanks again,
Elana

Cooperative Education Coordinator, Randolph Technical Career Center. #VTed

5. Follow Like-Minded People

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5. Follow Like-Minded People in Education

I think that there needs to be a 5 1/2 added to the list. I follow hundreds of like-minded people, but I also follow those that I don't necessarily agree with.

For me, a great deal of the value of social media is to have not only conversations with those I agree with, but also to have authentic dialogue with those that I might not. What it comes down to is ensuring that my growth and development is not limited to a narrow scope of vision. This allows me to take the blinders off and have a “mind-set of discovery.”

The excerpts below George Kohlrieser's from "The Power of Authentic Dialogue" really do a great job of digging into this idea a little more deeply

“Dialogue is about shared inquiry, a way of thinking and reflecting. … It requires a shift in mind-set about what the relationship with the other means. The focus is on understanding the other person, not only on making them understand you. Dialogue is an exchange in which people think together and discover something new. It is the seeking of greater truth. The depth of dialogue brings the participants to a different level, where they come to a deeper understanding of each other.”

“In times of constant change and increasing complexity, we need to take into account our growing interdependence, and dialogue takes us there. Dialogue is an important means of developing a culture of collaboration, and creative dialogue can also be used as a means to search for new ideas, ultimately leading to innovations in any field.”

“In reality, no one person has ‘the truth,’ but when people believe they already know everything, they derive no benefit from dialogue. One can have only a perception, an interpretation, or a subjective part of the truth. To move beyond subjectivity, leaders must have the skills to engage in dialogue, to decide, and to act… The ultimate question is whether all view-points, especially opposing or minority opinions, have been heard.”

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

Thanks for encouraging people

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Thanks for encouraging people to just jump in. I'm a big fan of the "ready-fire-aim" school of change and find that often educators are so anxious to get things right that they won't take the risk of just jumping in. It reminds me of that moment when you stand on the edge of the high dive, thinking, "ok, I"m going to jump...now. No...now! I mean..." at a certain point you have to jump and trust that you'll swim well enough to get to the edge of the pool once you hit the water.

Teacher, Writer, and Artist

HERE'S MY TEN 1. Being a

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HERE'S MY TEN

1. Being a parent doesn’t make you a better teacher. Being a teacher makes you a better parent.

2. Those savant students who know as much as you do about the subject you teach sure do keep you sharp.

3. I found out pretty quickly, even though I tried, that you can’t fix a kid’s learning, behavior, or emotional disorders right there in third period while you’re talking about the Battle of Gettysburg. I got some good advice from Lurlene the principal one time on that one when she said … Fix the behavior; not the kid. You don’t have time to do any real fixing, she said. That’s the job of their therapist. If their parents care enough to get them one.

4. The five most powerful words you can say to a student, a struggling student or otherwise, are … I am proud of you. When you say this a lot, and always at the right times, students will improve in their academic skills, and sometimes even their emotional and behavioral disorders seem to lighten. At the same time, as a teacher, your silent mantra should be … Don’t give up. I’m proud of me, too.

5. The moment when their eyes light up and they say this is great stuff and they mean it … that’s it. That’s why you teach.

6. You’re willing to spend your own money, too. You love to go to The School Box, even online. You love the way the place looks and smells. It’s like a toy store for teachers. You feel creative and engaging and dedicated the moment you walk in. The teacher’s section at Dollar Tree ain’t bad, either. I learned early that kids will kill for stickers. Not other kids. You. They will rush your desk like the Pamplona running of the bulls for a sticker that says they did a good job.

7. The class periods and full days and weeks and months and semesters when their eyes don’t light up and they never say this is great stuff makes you wonder why you teach. Lurlene gave me some good advice on that, too. She said … Don’t take it personally.

8. The very best teacher advice I ever heard from Lurlene was advice she freely handed out to needy parents and students, too. Lurlene would listen very carefully to their drama, without interrupting, and then she’d say … Get over yourself. To a mom, dad, and student, after they got over themselves, they always ended up thanking Lurlene for the good advice and tough love.

9. There are very few teachers and parents who are confident enough in themselves to give out tough love. The ones who are confident enough give it to themselves, too. That’s how they back it up.

10. The time spent driving home from school was long enough to go over the day, every day, and figure what I could have done better … where I truly screwed up … and sometimes where I did a good job. It was also the best time to grieve, and even weep, for what you saw and experienced that day. I never wore sunglasses while driving until I became a teacher.

www.actionjacksonart.com

Spanish Instructor from Provo, Utah

I think that sharing these

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I think that sharing these kinds of ideas make me a better educator and I can help my students and other educators become better educators. Thanks

So glad to meet other

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So glad to meet other edutopians here. Got an education blog on investments @ 2013 ways to invest blog

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

So glad that you found it

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So glad that you found it useful. Feel free to reach out to me here or on twitter with any additional help. Like you said, it's about the journey, not the destination :)

Thank you for sharing so much

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Thank you for sharing so much information in this article. I will be referring back to it often so that I can review many of the links that you suggested. My desire is to become a more effective professional educator. I realize that staying connected to other professionals will help me with my reflective practices. These are all components in achieving success as a life-long teacher and learner. I am excited about the journey!

System Behaviour Strategist, Calgary, Alberta

Thanks for posting. I am a

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Thanks for posting. I am a huge advocate of twitter as I find it is amazing tool which connects me to many of my passions in life, both teaching and non-teaching. The world of teaching includes, gurus of trauma such Bruce Perry, advocates of aboriginal education, those working with homeless youth, educators working with the marginalized in India... the list goes on. There truly is a world of teaching out there, and social media such as twitter takes us there.

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Thanks!

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Glad you enjoyed the blog and I look forward to you getting on Twitter. I'm at @elanaleoni if you'd like to connect on Twitter.

Re: failure. It's funny that you describe it as walking on egg shells -- I admittedly was part of the head-nodders saying failure was ok (and should be embraced and taught!) BUT I wasn't failing. It took a leap of faith through blogging, using social media, and creating a supportive PLN (professional learning network) for me to take the leap. So, I know it's hard!

Looking forward to connecting on Twitter!

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