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Currently studying Curriculum & Instruction for Adults

This blog has so much

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This blog has so much information! I am going to make note of all the highlighted areas to look up. I am a college instructor and I want to be as connected with my students as they want me to be. I do Face Book regularly, but not twitter. I think now that I have read this, I can see good reasons to tweet. Each point you made was helpful and having the first one encouraging us to make mistakes--marvelous! How many situations have we all been in (or are in) where it's like walking on egg shells? My, so stressful. The idea of trying all sorts of ideas or avenues to experiment with and learn from is good for a newbie like me. I know in doing this I will find ways I can better connect with my students, and be helped at the same time. I am looking forward to using some new ideas with my online students this fall! Thank you.

You could read the book The

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You could read the book The Connected Educator for even more tips. http://amzn.to/X655qq (5 stars on Amazon)

Blogs

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I am new to blogs and hoping to gain some great experiences and knowledge from them. I do believe that to be a successful school there should be connections among teachers. Right now in my school district that is the big idea and the goal we are working towards. We have a common planning period and we are in the process of implementing PLCs. I hope to see a positive change from the PLCs.

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Being Connected

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Hi Tara,

I'm sorry you felt that way. I actually met a lot of people I've never interacted with or met face to face in the media room and I'm really sorry we couldn't connect again. It's very important we're constantly networking with as many people as possible.

In fact, that's what I really loved about this conference. I met so many different types of educators from different countries and I came away thinking that ASCD's annual conference is a great place to connect with many that aren't yet connected (and I was constantly impressed with how passionate they were and how well-versed they were with so many education issues/strategies).

I think you bring up a great point re: social media. Social media alone won't make you successful and Twitter may not be a fit for all educators. I just stress that there has to be some way (online or face-to-face) that others connect and learn from. Without that, they stay alone and unsupported. I tried to adapt the post and make it broad enough that it would work for other social networks besides twitter (Google Plus, Facebook, Edu-online communities etc.) but it's definitely a hard thing to do in a blog post.

Thanks for your feedback - I know it takes courage to bring these points up and I myself, will take it to heart, and make sure no one else feels the way you did.

Best,
Elana

Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Good point

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Thanks Michelle. I think it's very important to follow both types of people (those like-minded and not). As I'm sure you found, people that I follow that have different views from me quite often get me thinking more about different issues.

I think when someone is first starting out, it may be easiest (and be that easy win to get them addicted) if they follow like-minded people but you're completely right! Thanks for reading.

I think it's important to

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I think it's important to point out to readers here that this statement only applies to the table/people you sat with: "one of the main themes that kept surfacing was the need for more 'connected educators.'"

It's great that a very white middle-class group of Apple users had an opportunity to sit together and have conversations about things in common, but it is not accurate to say that they identified a main theme for everyone at the conference. The commenter above (Michelle) has a good point about the dangers of an echo chamber. At the conference, people at that table were only interested in connecting with themselves. I never saw them reach out to anyone else in the room.

I have no problem with that. What I do have a problem with is this underlying assumption is that everyone else wants to be like them---or that their privileged approach is right for everyone. There appears to be no room for asking "What can I learn from the fantastic educators I meet who are successful without social media?" There is no reflection to ask "What might I be missing out on?", just a view that teachers not using social media are the ones at a loss. There is enough weight on the backs of teachers without shaming them for not having a Twitter account.

Being connected works for me---although I stay far away from edcamps as possible. (The attitude is too much like the one I've already described. It's neither inclusive nor tolerant, based on what I've seen.) However, I would never suggest that it should work for everyone. I celebrate teaching and learning in all of its many forms.

I love that you all had the

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I love that you all had the chance to connect face to face, and it's so awesome that we can continue conversations through social media after conferences are over.

Great advice for new users! I would only add one more, and that would be to follow people who are NOT like-minded. Twitter and educator networks are often criticized for being "echo chambers." I am very intentional about whom I follow and seek out people who do not agree with me, think like me, etc. I feel that it really provides a good balance to my network.

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